60 Reasons why you should stop thinking about it and just go travelling

The reasons why people travel vary from person to person. But no matter what age, what destination or what adventure they wish to go on, for the majority of people it’s just a pipe dream brushed aside by the ‘real world’ and society pressures to be successful. Why do people push the idea of travelling aside? It’s because they are scared of the unknown, the potential problems, the what ifs, money, expectation or maybe they are just scared to open their eyes to the world. Trust me once you do it there’s no turning back. Which is exactly the reason you shouldn’t push back the idea!

Here are some reasons why you should forget all your worries and make travelling a part of your ‘real world’ dreams and desires.

  1. to get away from your bubble
  2. to discover new countries
  3. to immerse yourself in other cultures
  4. for the people you meet, backpackers or locals
  5. for the memories you make
  6. to fuel your wanderlust
  7. for your future career, travelling looks great on a resume
  8. for your future self’s experiences,
  9. to learn new things about yourself
  10. maybe even find yourself
  11. create a divide between you and your life pressures
  12. to enjoy waking up on a Monday
  13. to stay in a different place each night
  14. to get lost in a city where you don’t speak the language
  15. to learn another language
  16. for the stories you will tell your future children/grandchildren
  17. find the partner of your dreams
  18. to find a job which you enjoy waking up for
  19. turn your hobby into your career, for a period of time or a lifetime
  20. to live
  21. to live for the moments
  22. to love
  23. to find out who your real friends are
  24. to make friends on every continent
  25. test yourself
  26. reach your boundaries
  27. discover your dreams
  28. break down media portrayals
  29. to forget what day it is
  30. to sleep under the stars
  31. to party like there’s no tomorrow
  32. to save yourself
  33. to create a business maybe
  34. break down your bubble
  35. open your eyes to possibilities
  36. open your eyes to the world
  37. identify what a small place you occupy in this world
  38. to realise the world keeps going on without you
  39. realise what you can get paid to do
  40. help others
  41. volunteer
  42. experience new cultures
  43. avoid getting a ‘real job’
  44. to see and experience things others haven’t
  45. for the social media posts
  46. for the opportunities
  47. for the adrenaline
  48. for the adrenaline-filled activities
  49. the food
  50. the realisation that material objects don’t matter
  51. identify social groups
  52. to experience history
  53. to see history being made
  54. to see places you have only ever dreamed about
  55. for the jealously on your friend’s, family’s faces
  56. for the skills you learn
  57. for the life skills you acquire
  58. for the knowledge you gain
  59. for the stories people won’t believe are true
  60. for the sun, ocean, tan, mountains, forests and new environments

These are just a few of the reasons I can think of, there are a million more reasons why you should just go and travel and take the risk. “the only things you regret in life are, the chances you didn’t take”

60 reasons why you should stop thinking about it and just go travelling

Colombia: Food Guide

Colombia is known for many things: Pablo Escobar, gangs, violence and most importantly Caribbean beaches but one of the best things about the country by far is the food. Colombian food is like no other, you will walk into a fruit market and you will have no idea what over 60% of the fruit is.

Colombia is a country surrounded by the Caribbean and Pacific Ocean, situated in the amazon rainforest, it has miles and miles of farm land, mountainous terrain and a year round constant climate. All this makes Colombia the perfect place for growing crops, catching fresh fish, making bread, picking fruit and consistently maintaining a year round cycle of fresh produce.

Some of the fruit I didn’t know before I arrived in Colombia were: Granadilla, Lulo, Guanabana, Maracuya (kind of Passion Fruit), Uchuva and Mangosteen.

Granadilla is a orange sized fruit, orange in colour, but the shell is hard. You crack the shell and break the Granadilla in half to open up the contents in the middle. Inside is a collection of small seeds covered in a mucous-like substance (tastes better than it sounds). It’s very refreshing and slides down your throat easily.

images

Lulo is a small orange fruit, with a tangy citrus like taste and is full of Vitamin C. Again the fruit is incased in a shell, which is edible but the seeds inside are the best part.

https://annysadventuresblog.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/how-to-get-a-job-as-a-seasonnaire/

Guanabana is green and spiky on the outside but white and soft on the inside, you eat the inside white part, which is very soft and mushy and has a very tasty, sweet flavour.

Soursop-fruit

Maracuya is a type of passion fruit with practically the same flavour. The difference being that they are the size of grapefruits which gives them many more seeds than a standard passion fruit.

https://annysadventuresblog.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/how-to-get-a-job-as-a-seasonnaire/

Uchuva is a small tomato like fruit (it reminds me of a tomato when it first starts to grow) except they are yellow in colour. They are very good with aiding digestion and have a tangy flavour.

https://annysadventuresblog.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/how-to-get-a-job-as-a-seasonnaire/

Mangosteen is a fruit originating from Asia, it is a medium sized dark purple fruit which you break in half to reveal the white flesh inside. This has a soft melon-like texture and tastes sweet.

https://annysadventuresblog.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/how-to-get-a-job-as-a-seasonnaire/

In Colombia juices are very popular and can be made from any of these fruits, the juices are mostly freshly made within restaurants or juice bars.

Colombia also has some very delicious savoury food, here are a few of my favourites:

Arepas – A corn tortilla like (but thicker) bread. They are mostly eaten for breakfast or as a snack, with cheese, jam or whatever you fancy spread on top. You can also buy them fried with an egg inside, these are called ‘arepas de huevo’.

Empanadas – A pasty or corn circle folded in half with meat inside and then fried. You can buy them with many different fillings such as cheese, chicken, pork or beef.

http://remezcla.com/lists/food/empanadas-of-latin-america/

 

Seafood is very popular in Colombia specifically the closer you get to the ocean. This is a photo of a typical Colombian meal on the coast

IMG_2458Fish, rice (usually coconut flavoured) and plantain which is similar to a banana but not as sweet. Plantains can be cut and fried (as pictured), made into chips or just baked. Yuka is a root vegetable similar to parsnip, it can also be cut and fried (as shown), baked or made into chips.

 

 

 

 

This is another traditional Colombian meal, containing; a baked plantain, an arepas with cheese, meats, sausage, guacamole, corn, potatoes, and yuka (fried).

IMG_1936

These are just some of the foods I found interesting when I visited Colombia.

Colombia food guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bogota, Colombia's capital

Bogota is the capital of Colombia and the third largest city in South America with over 8 million inhabitant and is located at 2,640m (8,660ft) above sea level. Bogota is a diverse city rich in history with its colonial streets, cathedrals and museums, as well as being one of the fastest growing modern cities in South America. Bogota has it all.

There is something welcoming about the city, the buildings are bright (some with street art), the people are friendly and happy, there is a large amount of open space and everyone loves to be outside. It’s a completely different feel from a city like London with exactly the same amount of people.

Bogota has its fashionable malls and upscale apartments as well as areas which residents wouldn’t visit. I quite happily walked around different parts of the city without feeling unsafe and I am from North Norfolk in England where nothing major happens.

Bogota has lots of different things to see and do, some of the major tourist attractions are as follows:

Monserrate – A Cathedral on top of the mountain with fantastic views of the city, you can walk up the mountain to get to the top or take a gondola or train. The cathedral is beautiful and they have a section where locals can set up stalls and sell products they have made.

Museo del Ore – The Gold museum in downtown Bogota is one of the most famous museums in Bogota and is home to over 55,000 individual pieces of gold, all made in different shapes and patterns. All of the items were found in different regions in Colombia.

Lake Guatavita – Lake Guatavita is located 35 miles north east of Bogota and is a lake hidden in the top of a mountain. The lake is sacred for tribes, who use the lakes in ceremonies and is thought to be the base of the legend El Dorado. The leader of the tribe would be covered in gold or gold dust and float onto the water in a raft and then dive into the water washing off the gold. Members of the tribe would then throw in any gold as an offering by worshipers. Some of the gold artefacts from Lake Guatavita are displayed in the Museo del Ore.

The Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira – Also known as Catedral de sal de Zipaquira, is an old salt mine which has been turned into a Cathedral underground, it is located 30 miles from Bogota. Everything in the cathedral is made from salt- the floors, walls, sculptures and steps. When you first walk into the cathedral there are 14 small chapels representing the stations of the cross, which illustrate the events of Jesus’ last journey, that lead into the main cathedral area. The details and the inside of the church are beautiful and it’s still a working cathedral.

Guasca – Around 30 miles north east of Bogota and is a quant farmers town located in the countryside, with beautiful mountains and landscapes.

Chia – Another town, located around 14 miles outside of Bogota. Chia used to be a small countryside town which has steadily grown over the last few years into a fairly large city, but it still holds the feeling of a small city.

Andres – Andres Carne de Res is a must go for any trip to Bogota or even Colombia. It’s located in Chia and is a 2.76 square mile restaurant with 11 dinning areas and 5 kitchens. A road runs in the middle of the restaurants and it truly is a one of a kind place. They have thought of everything, on one side of the road is the restaurant and on the opposite side of the road is the car park. There is another dining area of traditional Colombian ‘hang over’ or fast food for your journey home and they have a company who, for 25,000COP, will drive you and your car back to Bogota. They even have an area where you can drop off your ‘too drunk to stand up’ friends in return for a ticket and they can sleep in hammocks until you are ready to pick them up and leave. They have truly thought of everything!

Shopping – Bogota is home to a number of large indoor malls, Andino, Centro and Centro Comercial Atlantis are three high end malls. Andino has a large variety of stores, including American brands such as Aeropostale, Adidas, Zara, Gucci and Prada. This is definitely a good place to do some shopping, keep in mind though foreign brands tend to be a little on the expensive side in Colombia, due to import costs etc, whereas Colombian made products are very cheap in comparison.

Bogota is a great city with a mixture of everything- history, culture, modern society and traditional life, definitely a must see city.

 

Bogota, Colombia’s capital

Bogota is the capital of Colombia and the third largest city in South America with over 8 million inhabitant and is located at 2,640m (8,660ft) above sea level. Bogota is a diverse city rich in history with its colonial streets, cathedrals and museums, as well as being one of the fastest growing modern cities in South America. Bogota has it all.

There is something welcoming about the city, the buildings are bright (some with street art), the people are friendly and happy, there is a large amount of open space and everyone loves to be outside. It’s a completely different feel from a city like London with exactly the same amount of people.

Bogota has its fashionable malls and upscale apartments as well as areas which residents wouldn’t visit. I quite happily walked around different parts of the city without feeling unsafe and I am from North Norfolk in England where nothing major happens.

Bogota has lots of different things to see and do, some of the major tourist attractions are as follows:

Monserrate – A Cathedral on top of the mountain with fantastic views of the city, you can walk up the mountain to get to the top or take a gondola or train. The cathedral is beautiful and they have a section where locals can set up stalls and sell products they have made.

Museo del Ore – The Gold museum in downtown Bogota is one of the most famous museums in Bogota and is home to over 55,000 individual pieces of gold, all made in different shapes and patterns. All of the items were found in different regions in Colombia.

Lake Guatavita – Lake Guatavita is located 35 miles north east of Bogota and is a lake hidden in the top of a mountain. The lake is sacred for tribes, who use the lakes in ceremonies and is thought to be the base of the legend El Dorado. The leader of the tribe would be covered in gold or gold dust and float onto the water in a raft and then dive into the water washing off the gold. Members of the tribe would then throw in any gold as an offering by worshipers. Some of the gold artefacts from Lake Guatavita are displayed in the Museo del Ore.

The Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira – Also known as Catedral de sal de Zipaquira, is an old salt mine which has been turned into a Cathedral underground, it is located 30 miles from Bogota. Everything in the cathedral is made from salt- the floors, walls, sculptures and steps. When you first walk into the cathedral there are 14 small chapels representing the stations of the cross, which illustrate the events of Jesus’ last journey, that lead into the main cathedral area. The details and the inside of the church are beautiful and it’s still a working cathedral.

Guasca – Around 30 miles north east of Bogota and is a quant farmers town located in the countryside, with beautiful mountains and landscapes.

Chia – Another town, located around 14 miles outside of Bogota. Chia used to be a small countryside town which has steadily grown over the last few years into a fairly large city, but it still holds the feeling of a small city.

Andres – Andres Carne de Res is a must go for any trip to Bogota or even Colombia. It’s located in Chia and is a 2.76 square mile restaurant with 11 dinning areas and 5 kitchens. A road runs in the middle of the restaurants and it truly is a one of a kind place. They have thought of everything, on one side of the road is the restaurant and on the opposite side of the road is the car park. There is another dining area of traditional Colombian ‘hang over’ or fast food for your journey home and they have a company who, for 25,000COP, will drive you and your car back to Bogota. They even have an area where you can drop off your ‘too drunk to stand up’ friends in return for a ticket and they can sleep in hammocks until you are ready to pick them up and leave. They have truly thought of everything!

Shopping – Bogota is home to a number of large indoor malls, Andino, Centro and Centro Comercial Atlantis are three high end malls. Andino has a large variety of stores, including American brands such as Aeropostale, Adidas, Zara, Gucci and Prada. This is definitely a good place to do some shopping, keep in mind though foreign brands tend to be a little on the expensive side in Colombia, due to import costs etc, whereas Colombian made products are very cheap in comparison.

Bogota is a great city with a mixture of everything- history, culture, modern society and traditional life, definitely a must see city.

 

Zante, much more than a party island 

Zakynthos, Zante, Laganas, (the island of many names) is an island off Greece with a reputation as a major party island. Zante has the ‘lads holiday’ reputation, a place where teenagers/young adults go on holiday to spend a week laying on the beach and moving from one nightclub to the other, giving English people a bad reputation. It’s fine, each individual is entitled to spend their vacation however they wish. Zante however is way more than just an island people go to with the main intention to party.

Zante is a relatively large Greek island, around 158sq miles, its main terrain however is mountainous due to its volcanic past and is sparing with beaches. The beaches it does have are beautiful with white sand and perfectly clear ocean water.

Zante has a number of small towns including Zakynthos, Volimes, Porto Vromi, Askos, Alykes and Agios Nikolaos.

Zakynthos is one of the larger towns on the island, it is a town based around the main industrial port with many port front restaurants. Zakynthos has a main street with branded and souvenir shops, restaurants and a small number of bars but be warned the majority of the stores on the island are closed between the hours of 1pm and 5pm.

Alykes is one of the major tourist towns, it is located on the beach front and again has a main street with shops, restaurants and bars. Alykes is also home to some of the bigger hotels on the island as well as holiday villas.

Agios Nikolas is a port village with the port on one side of the main street and bars, restaurants and two stores the other side. It is one of the quieter towns but the port can become busy in the summer months with yachts mooring up for the night. Agios Nikolas has one hotel just outside the town and an English club resort called Peligoni. Peligoni is a club that offers a variety of water sports such as water skiing, sailing, kayaking and paddle boarding. There is also a bar, resturant, shop and kids’ club. The guests stay in villas located in close proximity to the club.

Apart from quaint towns, beaches and ports, Zakynthos has Navagio Beach (Shipwreck beach), a surreal and unforgettable place. Shipwreck beach can be accessed by boat or car- by boat you can go on the beach, snorkel in the breaktakingly clear water and cliff jump. By car you can stand in awe of the view below and experience the spectacularness from above. Whichever way you choose to view it, it’s definitely a must see.

Zakynthos has a large amount of secret coves, beaches, ports and beautiful views, the best way to see the island is to hire a car and just take a drive, stopping at anything that interests you. Zakynthos has a few towns on the far end of the island that are traditionally Greek, the locals have stalls outside their homes selling products they have made or grown such as honey.

I would personally suggest staying at the Peligoni club, in a villa with a car. You get to stay in the tranquil part of the island and have the freedom to travel anywhere on the island and explore and you have the use of the clubs facilities depending on how you want to spend your holidays.

From the port of Agios Nikolas you can also take a ferry (twice a day) to a slightly larger Greek island called Kefalonia, which is home to some of the best beaches in Greece. The ferry leaves the port in the morning and evening, meaning you could travel over for a day trip.

Greece as well as Zakynthos has lots of places to explore and is unique with history and culture so is definitely more than just a party island!

Zante much more than a party island